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cushiony

[ koosh-uh-nee ]
/ ˈkʊʃ ə ni /
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adjective

soft and comfortable like a cushion.
having or provided with cushions.
used as a cushion.

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Origin of cushiony

First recorded in 1830–40; cushion + -y1
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

VOCAB BUILDER

What does cushiony mean?

Cushiony is used to describe something that is soft and comfortable like a cushion.

A cushion is a soft object used to pad a surface or make it more comfortable to sit, stand, kneel, lie, or rest your head on. Couches have cushions that you sit on. A seat cushion is the kind on top of the seat of a chair. Pillows, mats, and pads are kinds of cushions. Cushions typically consist of a soft material filled with a soft or spongy substance, such as foam, feathers, or air (as in an air cushion)—anything that yields to pressure instead of remaining completely hard or firm.

Anything that has this feel to it can be described as cushiony. The adjective cushioned is used to describe something that has had a cushion or cushioning (padding) added to it. Something that’s cushioned is often also cushiony.

Cushiony is usually used in the context of literal cushions or things like them, but it can be used to describe other things. For example, new socks, a stuffed toy, and a lump of dough could all be described as cushiony (though the synonym pillowy is more often applied to food).

Example: Wow, this mattress is so soft and cushiony!

Where does cushiony come from?

The first records of the word cushiony come from the 1830s. The suffix -y makes it an adjective. The word cushion is thought to ultimately come from the Latin coxīnum, a combination of cōx(a), meaning “hip,” and the Latin suffix -īnus. It’s not entirely clear how a word meaning “hip” led to the word cushion, but the same suffix appears in the Latin word pulvīnus, which means “cushion” and is the root of the word pillow.

The word cushy can mean the same thing as cushiony, but is more often used in a figurative way to describe something easy and involving little effort, as in He’s got a cushy job where he just has to sit and read all day.

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What are some other forms related to cushiony?

  • cushioned (past tense verb, adjective)
  • cushion (noun)
  • uncushioned (adjective)

What are some synonyms for cushiony?

What are some words that share a root or word element with cushiony

What are some words that often get used in discussing cushiony?

How is cushiony used in real life?

Cushiony is most commonly applied to soft furniture, but it can be used to describe other things, like stuffed toys.

Try using cushiony!

Is cushiony used correctly in the following sentence?

“I think we should add some more padding to make these seats more cushiony.”

Example sentences from the Web for cushiony

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