declare

[ dih-klair ]
/ dɪˈklɛər /

verb (used with object), de·clared, de·clar·ing.

verb (used without object), de·clared, de·clar·ing.

QUIZZES

DO YOU KNOW THIS VOCABULARY FROM "THE HANDMAID'S TALE"?

"The Handmaid's Tale" was required reading for many of us in school. Everyone else has probably watched the very popular and addictive TV show. Do you remember this vocabulary from the book, and do you know what these terms mean?
Question 1 of 10
decorum

Origin of declare

1275–1325; Middle English declaren < Latin dēclārāre to explain, equivalent to dē- de- + clārāre to make clear (clār(us) clear + -āre infinitive suffix)

synonym study for declare

3. Declare, affirm, assert, protest imply making something known emphatically, openly, or formally. To declare is to make known, sometimes in the face of actual or potential contradiction: to declare someone the winner of a contest. To affirm is to make a statement based on one's reputation for knowledge or veracity, or so related to a generally recognized truth that denial is not likely: to affirm the necessity of high standards. To assert is to state boldly, usually without other proof than personal authority or conviction: to assert that the climate is changing. To protest is to affirm publicly, as if in the face of doubt: to protest that a newspaper account is misleading.

OTHER WORDS FROM declare

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for declare

British Dictionary definitions for declare

declare
/ (dɪˈklɛə) /

verb (mainly tr)

Derived forms of declare

declarable, adjective

Word Origin for declare

C14: from Latin dēclārāre to make clear, from clārus bright, clear
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012