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digest

[ verb dih-jest, dahy-; noun dahy-jest ]
/ verb dɪˈdʒɛst, daɪ-; noun ˈdaɪ dʒɛst /
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See synonyms for: digest / digested on Thesaurus.com

verb (used with object)
verb (used without object)
to digest food.
to undergo digestion, as food.
noun
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Origin of digest

First recorded in 1350–1400; (verb) Middle English digesten, from Latin dīgestus “separated, dissolved” (past participle of dīgerere), equivalent to dī-di-2 + ges- “carry, bear” (base of gerere) + -tus past participle suffix; (noun) Middle English: “collection of laws,” from Late Latin dīgesta (plural), Latin: “collection of writings,” neuter plural of dīgestus, as above

synonym study for digest

11. See summary.

OTHER WORDS FROM digest

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

MORE ABOUT DIGEST

What does inventory mean?

An inventory is a complete list of all merchandise or stock of items owned by or available from a business.

At a store, an inventory is the complete list of all items for sale at the store. At a manufacturer, an inventory is a complete list of all the raw materials they have, as well as finished items and items being created.

An inventory is also the specific set of products to sell, as in The store’s inventory of superhero capes is running low and will probably sell out soon.

An inventory can also refer to figurative belongings, such as a person’s personality traits and skills.

To inventory means to add things to an inventory list, whether a literal or figurative list, as in I inventoried my options for colleges and chose the school I’ll attend next year.

Example: Can you take inventory tonight so we can be ready for the rush tomorrow?

Where does inventory come from?

The first records of the term inventory come from around the 1300s. It ultimately comes from the Medieval Latin inventōrium.

You’ve probably seen inventory used in computer gaming, where your inventory is the place where you can keep track of the materials you’ve collected while playing the game. Often, the inventory holds items that you use to enhance your performance, build or craft something, or customize your character. The first video game to have an inventory system was “The Oregon Trail” in 1971, which tasked players with traveling from Missouri to Oregon in an 1800s wagon caravan, picking up food, tools, rope, and the like to add to their inventory along the way.

Did you know … ?

What are some other forms related to inventory?

  • inventoriable (adjective)
  • inventorial (adjective)
  • inventorially (adverb)
  • overinventoried (adjective)
  • preinventory (noun)

What are some synonyms for inventory?

What are some words that share a root or word element with inventory

What are some words that often get used in discussing inventory?

How is inventory used in real life?

Inventory is mostly used in a business context.

 

Try using inventory!

Which of the following is NOT a synonym for inventory?

A. debt
B. supply
C. reserve
D. backlog

How to use digest in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for digest (1 of 2)

digest

verb (dɪˈdʒɛst, daɪ-)
noun (ˈdaɪdʒɛst)

Word Origin for digest

C14: from Late Latin dīgesta writings grouped under various heads, from Latin dīgerere to divide, from di- apart + gerere to bear

British Dictionary definitions for digest (2 of 2)

Digest
/ (ˈdaɪdʒɛst) /

noun
Roman law an arrangement of excerpts from the writings and opinions of eminent lawyers, contained in 50 books compiled by order of Justinian in the sixth century ad
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for digest

digest
[ dī-jĕst, dĭ- ]

v.
To convert food into simpler chemical compounds that can be absorbed and assimilated by the body, as by chemical and muscular action in the alimentary canal.
To soften or disintegrate by means of chemical action, heat, or moisture.

Other words from digest

di•gest′i•bili•ty n.di•gesti•ble adj.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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