disquieting

[dis-kwahy-i-ting]

Origin of disquieting

First recorded in 1570–80; disquiet + -ing2
Related formsdis·qui·et·ing·ly, adverbself-dis·qui·et·ing, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for disquietingly

Contemporary Examples of disquietingly

  • Teju Cole's disquietingly powerful debut Open City does none of the above.

    The Daily Beast logo
    The Best Debut of 2011

    Taylor Antrim

    February 7, 2011

Historical Examples of disquietingly

  • Grief mounted into the brain and worked there disquietingly.

    Howards End

    E. M. Forster

  • It's the story of a politician who is disquietingly fascinating (like you).

    Dear Enemy

    Jean Webster

  • How any one could contrive to make the man fall ill and die is, to the man's relations, thoroughly and disquietingly mysterious.

  • For this man of heroic mold who rode beside her was disquietingly captivating in the bold recklessness of his youth.

    'Firebrand' Trevison

    Charles Alden Seltzer

  • Just at this point the engineer with a startled exclamation seized the throttle and brought us to a disquietingly abrupt stop.

    From Pillar to Post

    John Kendrick Bangs