annoying

[ uh-noi-ing ]
/ əˈnɔɪ ɪŋ /

adjective

causing annoyance; irritatingly bothersome: annoying delays.

Origin of annoying

Middle English word dating back to 1325–75; see origin at annoy, -ing2

Related forms

Definition for annoying (2 of 2)

annoy

[ uh-noi ]
/ əˈnɔɪ /

verb (used with object)

to disturb or bother (a person) in a way that displeases, troubles, or slightly irritates.
to molest; harm.

verb (used without object)

to be bothersome or troublesome.

noun

Archaic. an annoyance.

Origin of annoy

1250–1300; (v.) Middle English an(n)oien, enoien < Anglo-French, Old French anoier, anuier to molest, harm, tire < Late Latin inodiāre to cause aversion, from Latin phrase mihi in odiō est … I dislike …; cf. in-2, odium, ennui, noisome; (noun) Middle English a(n)noi, ennoi < Anglo-French, Old French a(n)nui, etc., derivative of the v.

Related forms

an·noy·er, nounhalf-an·noyed, adjectiveun·an·noyed, adjective

Can be confused

aggravate annoy irritate

Synonym study

1. See bother, worry.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for annoying

British Dictionary definitions for annoying (1 of 2)

annoying

/ (əˈnɔɪɪŋ) /

adjective

causing irritation or displeasure

Derived Forms

annoyingly, adverb

British Dictionary definitions for annoying (2 of 2)

annoy

/ (əˈnɔɪ) /

verb

to irritate or displease
to harass with repeated attacks

Derived Forms

annoyer, noun

Word Origin for annoy

C13: from Old French anoier, from Late Latin inodiāre to make hateful, from Latin in odiō (esse) (to be) hated, from odium hatred
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012