distinction

[ dih-stingk-shuhn ]
/ dɪˈstɪŋk ʃən /

noun

Origin of distinction

1175–1225; Middle English distinccioun (< Anglo-French) < Latin distinctiōn- (stem of distinctiō), equivalent to distinct(us) (see distinct) + -iōn- -ion

Related forms

dis·tinc·tion·less, adjectivesub·dis·tinc·tion, nounun·der·dis·tinc·tion, noun

Synonym study

3. Distinction and difference may both refer to perceivable dissimilarities and, in this meaning, may be used interchangeably: There is a distinction ( difference ) between the two. Distinction, however, usually suggests the perception of dissimilarity, as the result of analysis and discrimination: a carefully made distinction between two treatments of the same theme; whereas difference refers only to the condition of being dissimilar: the difference between Gothic and Roman architecture. “A distinction without a difference” is a way of referring to an artificial or false discrimination. 7. See honor.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for distinction

British Dictionary definitions for distinction

distinction

/ (dɪˈstɪŋkʃən) /

noun

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012