dormouse

[ dawr-mous ]
/ ˈdɔrˌmaʊs /

noun, plural dor·mice [dawr-mahys]. /ˈdɔrˌmaɪs/.

any small, furry-tailed, Old World rodent of the family Gliridae, resembling small squirrels in appearance and habits.

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Origin of dormouse

First recorded in1400–50; late Middle English dormowse, dormoise; etymology obscure; perhaps Anglo-French derivative of Old French dormir “to sleep,” with final syllable reanalyzed as mouse, but no such Anglo-French word is known; see dormant, mouse
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for dormouse

British Dictionary definitions for dormouse

dormouse
/ (ˈdɔːˌmaʊs) /

noun plural -mice

any small Old World rodent of the family Gliridae, esp the Eurasian Muscardinus avellanarius, resembling a mouse with a furry tail

Word Origin for dormouse

C15: dor-, perhaps from Old French dormir to sleep, from Latin dormīre + mouse
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012