dragon

[ drag-uh n ]
/ ˈdræg ən /

noun

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Question 1 of 10
Which of the following words means “to travel or journey, especially to walk on foot”?

Origin of dragon

1175–1225; Middle English < Old French < Latin dracōn- (stem of dracō) < Greek drákōn kind of serpent, probably orig. epithet, the (sharp-)sighted one, akin to dérkesthai to look

OTHER WORDS FROM dragon

drag·on·ish, adjectivedrag·on·like, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for dragonlike

  • On his breastplate was a device of a dragonlike beast perched with its tail around a planet, and a crown above.

    Space Viking|Henry Beam Piper
  • Traffic densities were virtually zero despite the efforts of the dragonlike snow-burners trying to keep the roadways clear.

    Code Three|Rick Raphael
  • Sucking at a crack of light the red setter's kindled nose glowed and snorted with dragonlike ferocity.

    Peace on Earth, Good-will to Dogs|Eleanor Hallowell Abbott

British Dictionary definitions for dragonlike

dragon
/ (ˈdræɡən) /

noun

Derived forms of dragon

dragoness, fem ndragonish, adjective

Word Origin for dragon

C13: from Old French, from Latin dracō, from Greek drakōn; related to drakos eye
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012