emaciated

[ ih-mey-shee-ey-tid ]
/ ɪˈmeɪ ʃiˌeɪ tɪd /

adjective

marked by emaciation.

Origin of emaciated

First recorded in 1655–65; emaciate + -ed2
Related formsun·e·ma·ci·at·ed, adjective

Definition for emaciated (2 of 2)

emaciate

[ ih-mey-shee-eyt ]
/ ɪˈmeɪ ʃiˌeɪt /

verb (used with object), e·ma·ci·at·ed, e·ma·ci·at·ing.

to make abnormally lean or thin by a gradual wasting away of flesh.

Origin of emaciate

1640–50; < Latin ēmaciātus, wasted away, equivalent to ē- e-1 + maciātus, past participle of maciāre to produce leanness (maci(ēs) leanness + -ātus -ate1)
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for emaciated

British Dictionary definitions for emaciated (1 of 2)

emaciated

/ (ɪˈmeɪsɪˌeɪtɪd) /

adjective

abnormally thin

British Dictionary definitions for emaciated (2 of 2)

emaciate

/ (ɪˈmeɪsɪˌeɪt) /

verb

(usually tr) to become or cause to become abnormally thin
Derived Formsemaciation, noun

Word Origin for emaciate

C17: from Latin ēmaciāre to make lean, from macer thin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012