endogamy

[en-dog-uh-mee]

Origin of endogamy

First recorded in 1860–65; endo- + -gamy
Related formsen·dog·a·mous, en·do·gam·ic [en-doh-gam-ik] /ˌɛn doʊˈgæm ɪk/, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for endogamy

Historical Examples of endogamy

  • In people living in small communities, endogamy does not appear to have ever existed.

  • Sometimes an endogamy of religious origin is met with, among the Jews for example.

  • They formerly had endogamy, and it is stated that brothers and sisters married.

    Folkways

    William Graham Sumner

  • There is in this case exogamy in relation to the clan and endogamy in relation to the tribe.

    The Races of Man

    Joseph Deniker

  • It simply means marrying-out, in contrast to endogamy, or marrying-in.

    Anthropology

    Robert Marett


British Dictionary definitions for endogamy

endogamy

noun
  1. anthropol marriage within one's own tribe or similar unitCompare exogamy (def. 1)
  2. pollination between two flowers on the same plant
Derived Formsendogamous or endogamic (ˌɛndəʊˈɡæmɪk), adjective
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for endogamy
n.

1865, from endogamous (1865); for which see endo- + gamete.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

endogamy in Medicine

endogamy

[ĕn-dŏgə-mē]
n.
  1. Reproduction by the fusion of gametes of similar ancestry.
  2. Marriage within a particular group in accordance with custom or law.
Related formsen•doga•mous adj.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.