every

[ ev-ree ]
/ ˈɛv ri /

adjective

being one of a group or series taken collectively; each: We go there every day.
all possible; the greatest possible degree of: every prospect of success.

QUIZZES

GEE WHILLIKERS! WAIT TILL YOU SEE THIS WORD OF THE DAY QUIZ!

Do you remember all the words from last week, September 21–27, 2020? Then this quiz should be butyraceous.
Question 1 of 7
What does “yare” mean?

Idioms for every

Origin of every

First recorded in 1125–75; Middle English every, everich, Old English ǣfre ǣlc, literally “ever each” (the first element of the phrase reinforcing the second); see ever, each

synonym study for every

1. See each.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

British Dictionary definitions for every

every
/ (ˈɛvrɪ) /

determiner

each one (of the class specified), without exceptionevery child knows it
(not used with a negative) the greatest or best possibleevery hope of success
each: used before a noun phrase to indicate the recurrent, intermittent, or serial nature of a thingevery third day; every now and then; every so often
every bit (used in comparisons with as) quite; just; equallyevery bit as funny as the other show
every other each alternate; every secondevery other day
every which way
  1. in all directions; everywhereI looked every which way for you
  2. US and Canadian from all sidesstones coming at me every which way

Word Origin for every

C15 everich, from Old English ǣfre ǣlc, from ǣfre ever + ǣlc each
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with every

every

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.