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feeble

[ fee-buhl ]
/ ˈfi bəl /
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See synonyms for: feeble / feebleness / feebly on Thesaurus.com

adjective, fee·bler, fee·blest.

physically weak, as from age or sickness; frail.
weak intellectually or morally: a feeble mind.
lacking in volume, loudness, brightness, distinctness, etc.: a feeble voice; feeble light.
lacking in force, strength, or effectiveness: feeble resistance; feeble arguments.

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The rainy weather could not ________ my elated spirits on my graduation day.

Origin of feeble

First recorded in 1125–75; Middle English feble, from Old French, variant of fleible (by dissimilation), from Latin flēbilis “lamentable,” equivalent to flēre “to weep” + -bilis-ble
1. See weak.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

British Dictionary definitions for feeble

feeble
/ (ˈfiːbəl) /

adjective

lacking in physical or mental strength; frail; weak
inadequate; unconvincingfeeble excuses
easily influenced or indecisive
feebleness, nounfeebly, adverb
C12: from Old French feble, fleible, from Latin flēbilis to be lamented, from flēre to weep
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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