filch

[ filch ]
/ fɪltʃ /
||

verb (used with object)

to steal (especially something of small value); pilfer: to filch ashtrays from fancy restaurants.

Nearby words

  1. filasse,
  2. filate,
  3. filatov flap,
  4. filature,
  5. filbert,
  6. filcher,
  7. filchner ice shelf,
  8. file,
  9. file band,
  10. file card

Origin of filch

1250–1300; Middle English filchen to attack (in a body), take as booty, Old English fylcian to marshal (troops), draw (soldiers) up in battle array, derivative of gefylce band of men; akin to folk

SYNONYMS FOR filch
Related formsfilch·er, nounfilch·ing·ly, adverbun·filched, adjective

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for filching


British Dictionary definitions for filching

filch

/ (fɪltʃ) /

verb

(tr) to steal or take surreptitiously in small amounts; pilfer
Derived Formsfilcher, noun

Word Origin for filch

C16 filchen to steal, attack, perhaps from Old English gefylce band of men

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for filching

filch

v.

"steal," 1560s, slang, perhaps from c.1300 filchen "to snatch, take as booty," of unknown origin. Liberman says filch is probably from German filzen "comb through." Related: Filched; filching.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper