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View synonyms for flit

flit

[ flit ]

verb (used without object)

, flit·ted, flit·ting.
  1. to move lightly and swiftly; fly, dart, or skim along:

    bees flitting from flower to flower.

  2. to flutter, as a bird.
  3. to pass quickly, as time:

    hours flitting by.

  4. Chiefly Scot. and North England.
    1. to depart or die.
    2. to change one's residence.


verb (used with object)

, flit·ted, flit·ting.
  1. Chiefly Scot. to remove; transfer; oust or dispossess.

noun

  1. a light, swift movement; flutter.
  2. Scot. and North England. a change of residence; instance of moving to a new address.
  3. Slang: Extremely Disparaging and Offensive. a contemptuous term used to refer to a gay man.

flit

/ flɪt /

verb

  1. to move along rapidly and lightly; skim or dart
  2. to fly rapidly and lightly; flutter
  3. to pass quickly; fleet

    a memory flitted into his mind

  4. dialect.
    to move house
  5. informal.
    to depart hurriedly and stealthily in order to avoid obligations
  6. See elope
    an informal word for elope


noun

  1. the act or an instance of flitting
  2. slang.
    a male homosexual
  3. informal.
    a hurried and stealthy departure in order to avoid obligations (esp in the phrase do a flit )

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Derived Forms

  • ˈflitter, noun

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Other Words From

  • flitting·ly adverb

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Word History and Origins

Origin of flit1

First recorded in 1150–1200; Middle English flitten, from Old Norse flytja “to carry, convey,” Swedish flytta; fleet 2

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Word History and Origins

Origin of flit1

C12: from Old Norse flytja to carry

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Synonym Study

See fly 2.

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Example Sentences

This time we are back in 1941 and flit from Berlin (“the capital of a banana republic that had run out of bananas”) to Prague.

The great moonlight flit from Marrakech to Tangier was in motion.

Text messages and jokes flit incessantly between them, and business is conducted in a relaxed, familiar manner.

Were I of less girth I would flit through the window and fall upon my knees at your feet.

Among the branches flit birds, and winged genii like little cupids.

She saw a dark shadow flit over Musa's face: was it as the ship's lantern swayed in the slow swell of the sea?

She saw a pained look flit over the countenance of the visitor, and administered the only panacea she possessed.

She profited by the moments indecision to flit swiftly out of the ghostly arcade toward the avenue.

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