Dictionary.com

frenzy

[ fren-zee ]
/ ˈfrɛn zi /
Save This Word!
See synonyms for: frenzy / frenzied / frenzying on Thesaurus.com

noun, plural fren·zies.
a state of extreme mental agitation or wild excitement: There's something big businesses love about working their customers into a frenzy of anticipation.
a burst of agitated, energetic action or activity: Athens in the late 1960s was in the midst of a building frenzy.
a fit or spell of mental derangement; a paroxysm characteristic of or resulting from a mania: He is subject to these frenzies several times a year.
verb (used with object), fren·zied, fren·zy·ing.
to drive into a frenzy; make frantic: She was frenzied by fear when she smelled the smoke.
QUIZ
WILL YOU SAIL OR STUMBLE ON THESE GRAMMAR QUESTIONS?
Smoothly step over to these common grammar mistakes that trip many people up. Good luck!
Question 1 of 7
Fill in the blank: I can’t figure out _____ gave me this gift.

Origin of frenzy

First recorded in 1300–50; Middle English frenesie, from Old French, from Late Latin phrenēsis, from Late Greek, for Greek phrenîtis; see phrenitis

OTHER WORDS FROM frenzy

fren·zi·ly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use frenzy in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for frenzy

frenzy
/ (ˈfrɛnzɪ) /

noun plural -zies
violent mental derangement
wild excitement or agitation; distraction
a bout of wild or agitated activitya frenzy of preparations
verb -zies, -zying or -zied
(tr) to make frantic; drive into a frenzy

Word Origin for frenzy

C14: from Old French frenesie, from Late Latin phrēnēsis madness, delirium, from Late Greek, ultimately from Greek phrēn mind; compare frenetic
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
FEEDBACK