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Galileo

[ gal-uh-ley-oh, -lee-oh; for 1 also Italian gah-lee-le-aw ]
/ ˌgæl əˈleɪ oʊ, -ˈli oʊ; for 1 also Italian ˌgɑ liˈlɛ ɔ /
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noun
Galileo Galilei, 1564–1642, Italian physicist and astronomer.
Aerospace. a U.S. space probe designed to take photographs and obtain other scientific information while orbiting the planet Jupiter.
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Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use Galileo in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for Galileo (1 of 2)

Galileo1
/ (ˌɡælɪˈleɪəʊ) /

noun
full name Galileo Galilei. 1564–1642, Italian mathematician, astronomer, and physicist. He discovered the isochronism of the pendulum and demonstrated that falling bodies of different weights descend at the same rate. He perfected the refracting telescope, which led to his discovery of Jupiter's satellites, sunspots, and craters on the Earth's moon. He was forced by the Inquisition to recant his support of the Copernican system

British Dictionary definitions for Galileo (2 of 2)

Galileo2
/ (ˌɡælɪˈleɪəʊ) /

noun
a US spacecraft, launched 1989, that entered orbit around Jupiter in late 1995 to study the planet and its major satellites; burned up in the planet's atmosphere in 2003
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Cultural definitions for Galileo

Galileo
[ (gal-uh-lee-oh, gal-uh-lay-oh) ]

An Italian scientist of the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries; his full name was Galileo Galilei. Galileo proved that objects with different masses fall at the same velocity. One of the first persons to use a telescope to examine objects in the sky, he saw the moons of Jupiter, the mountains on the moon, and sunspots.

notes for Galileo

Authorities of the Roman Catholic Church forced Galileo to renounce his belief in the model of the solar system proposed by Nicolaus Copernicus. Galileo had to assert that the Earth stands still, and the sun revolves around it. A famous legend holds that Galileo, after making this public declaration about a motionless Earth, muttered, “Nevertheless, it does move.”
The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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