gearing

[ geer-ing ]
/ ˈgɪər ɪŋ /

noun Machinery.

an assembly of parts, especially a train of gears, for transmitting and modifying motion and torque in a machine.
the act or process of equipping with gears.
the method of installation of such gears.

Origin of gearing

First recorded in 1815–25; gear + -ing1

Definition for gearing (2 of 2)

Origin of gear

1150–1200; Middle English gere < Old Norse gervi, gørvi; akin to Old English gearwe equipment

OTHER WORDS FROM gear

gear·less, adjectivere·gear, verbun·geared, adjectivewell-geared, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for gearing

British Dictionary definitions for gearing (1 of 2)

gearing
/ (ˈɡɪərɪŋ) /

noun

an assembly of gears designed to transmit motion
the act or technique of providing gears to transmit motion
Also called: capital gearing accounting, British the ratio of a company's debt capital to its equity capitalUS word: leverage

British Dictionary definitions for gearing (2 of 2)

gear
/ (ɡɪə) /

noun

verb

Derived forms of gear

gearless, adjective

Word Origin for gear

C13: from Old Norse gervi; related to Old High German garawī equipment, Old English gearwe
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Science definitions for gearing

gear
[ gîr ]

A wheel with teeth around its rim that mesh with the teeth of another wheel to transmit motion. Gears are used to transmit power (as in a car transmission) or change the direction of motion in a mechanism (as in a differential axle). Fixed ratios of speed in various parts of a machine is often established by the arrangement of gears.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Idioms and Phrases with gearing

gear

see high gear; slip a cog (gear).

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.