heed

[heed]
See more synonyms for heed on Thesaurus.com
verb (used without object)
  1. to give attention; have regard.
noun
  1. careful attention; notice; observation (usually with give or take).

Origin of heed

before 900; Middle English heden, Old English hēdan; cognate with German hüten to guard, protect; akin to hood1
Related formsheed·er, nounun·heed·ed, adjectiveun·heed·ed·ly, adverbun·heed·ing, adjectiveun·heed·ing·ly, adverb

Synonyms for heed

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Antonyms for heed

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


Examples from the Web for heeding

Contemporary Examples of heeding

Historical Examples of heeding

  • Warn her after she has drunk, and the poison holds her from heeding.

    Lotus Buds

    Amy Carmichael

  • One of the quicken-berries dropped on the earth, and the Dedanns passed on not heeding.

    Irish Fairy Tales

    Edmond Leamy

  • "She has a fine generous nature," continued Cashel, not heeding the remark.

    Roland Cashel

    Charles James Lever

  • "You were right, at all events," said he, not heeding the sarcasm of my manner.

    A Day's Ride

    Charles James Lever

  • "Well, they're run their course now," said Nickie, not heeding the remark.


British Dictionary definitions for heeding

heed

noun
  1. close and careful attention; notice (often in the phrases give, pay, or take heed)
verb
  1. to pay close attention to (someone or something)
Derived Formsheeder, nounheedful, adjectiveheedfully, adverbheedfulness, noun

Word Origin for heed

Old English hēdan; related to Old Saxon hōdian, Old High German huoten
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for heeding

heed

n.

"attention, notice, regard," early 14c., apparently from heed (v.). Survives only in literal use and as the object of verbs (take heed, etc.).

heed

v.

Old English hedan "to heed, observe; to take care, attend," from West Germanic *hodjan (cf. Old Saxon hodian, Old Frisian hoda, Middle Dutch and Dutch hoeden, Old High German huotan, German hüten "to guard, watch"), from PIE *kadh- "to shelter, cover" (see hat). Related: Heeded; heeding.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper