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histamine

[ his-tuh-meen, -min ]

noun

  1. Biochemistry, Physiology. a heterocyclic amine, C 5 H 9 N 3 , released by mast cells when tissue is injured or in allergic and inflammatory reactions, causing dilation of small blood vessels and smooth muscle contraction.
  2. Pharmacology. a commercial form of this compound, obtained from histidine and used chiefly in the diagnosis of gastric and circulatory functions.


histamine

/ -mɪn; ˈhɪstəˌmiːn; ˌhɪstəˈmɪnɪk /

noun

  1. an amine formed from histidine and released by the body tissues in allergic reactions, causing irritation. It also stimulates gastric secretions, dilates blood vessels, and contracts smooth muscle. Formula: C 5 H 9 N 3 See also antihistamine


histamine

/ hĭstə-mēn′ /

  1. An organic compound found widely in animals and plants that in humans and other mammals is released as part of the body's immune response, causing physiological changes including dilation of the blood vessels, contraction of smooth muscle (as in the airways), and increased gastric acid secretion. The itching and sneezing typical of respiratory allergies are caused by the release of histamine. Chemical formula: C 5 H 9 N 3


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Derived Forms

  • histaminic, adjective
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Other Words From

  • his·ta·min·ic [his-t, uh, -, min, -ik], adjective
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Word History and Origins

Origin of histamine1

First recorded in 1910–15; hist(idine) + -amine
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Word History and Origins

Origin of histamine1

C20: from hist ( idine ) + -amine
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Example Sentences

Depending on the cause of a peptic ulcer, your doctor may prescribe different medications—such as proton pump inhibitors, histamine receptor blockers, or protectants—to relieve pain.

From Time

People with histamine allergies may even experience headaches, though probably not as severe as the migraines that can be triggered by cogeners, says Bonci.

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histaminasehistamine blocker