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imply

[ im-plahy ]
/ ɪmˈplaɪ /
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See synonyms for: imply / implied / implies / implying on Thesaurus.com

verb (used with object), im·plied, im·ply·ing.

to indicate or suggest without being explicitly stated: His words implied a lack of faith.
(of words) to signify or mean.
to involve as a necessary circumstance: Speech implies a speaker.
Obsolete. to enfold.

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Origin of imply

First recorded in 1325–75; Middle English implien, emplien, from Middle French emplier, from Latin implicāre; see implicate

usage note for imply

See infer.

OTHER WORDS FROM imply

re·im·ply, verb (used with object), re·im·plied, re·im·ply·ing.su·per·im·ply, verb (used with object), su·per·im·plied, su·per·im·ply·ing.

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH imply

imply , infer (see usage note at infer)
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

Example sentences from the Web for imply

British Dictionary definitions for imply

imply
/ (ɪmˈplaɪ) /

verb -plies, -plying or -plied (tr; may take a clause as object)

to express or indicate by a hint; suggestwhat are you implying by that remark?
to suggest or involve as a necessary consequence
logic to enable (a conclusion) to be inferred
obsolete to entangle or enfold

Word Origin for imply

C14: from Old French emplier, from Latin implicāre to involve; see implicate

undefined imply

See infer
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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