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interfere

[ in-ter-feer ]
/ ˌɪn tərˈfɪər /
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See synonyms for: interfere / interfering on Thesaurus.com

verb (used without object), in·ter·fered, in·ter·fer·ing.
Verb Phrases
interfere with, Chiefly British. to molest sexually.
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Origin of interfere

1520–30; inter- + -fere<Latin ferīre to strike; modeled on Middle French s'entreferir

OTHER WORDS FROM interfere

in·ter·fer·er, nounin·ter·fer·ing·ly, adverbnon·in·ter·fer·ing, adjectivenon·in·ter·fer·ing·ly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use interfere in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for interfere

interfere
/ (ˌɪntəˈfɪə) /

verb (intr)
(often foll by in) to interpose, esp meddlesomely or unwarrantedly; intervene
(often foll by with) to come between or in opposition; hinder; obstruct
(foll by with) euphemistic to assault sexually
to strike one against the other, as a horse's legs
physics to cause or produce interference

Derived forms of interfere

interferer, nouninterfering, adjectiveinterferingly, adverb

Word Origin for interfere

C16: from Old French s'entreferir to collide, from entre- inter- + ferir to strike, from Latin ferīre
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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