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View synonyms for intrusion

intrusion

[ in-troo-zhuhn ]

noun

  1. an act or instance of intruding.
  2. the state of being intruded.
  3. Law.
    1. an illegal act of entering, seizing, or taking possession of another's property.
    2. a wrongful entry after the determination of a particular estate, made before the remainderman or reversioner has entered.
  4. Geology.
    1. emplacement of molten rock in preexisting rock.
    2. plutonic rock emplaced in this manner.
    3. a process analogous to magmatic intrusion, as the injection of a plug of salt into sedimentary rocks.
    4. the matter forced in.


intrusion

/ ɪnˈtruːʒən /

noun

  1. the act or an instance of intruding; an unwelcome visit, interjection, etc

    an intrusion on one's privacy

    1. the movement of magma from within the earth's crust into spaces in the overlying strata to form igneous rock
    2. any igneous rock formed in this way
  2. property law an unlawful entry onto land by a stranger after determination of a particular estate of freehold and before the remainderman or reversioner has made entry


intrusion

/ ĭn-tro̅o̅zhən /

  1. The movement of magma through cracks in underground rocks within the Earth, usually in an upward direction.
  2. ◆ Rocks that form from the underground cooling of magma are generally coarse-grained (because they cool slowly so that large crystals have time to grow) and are called intrusive rocks.
  3. Compare extrusion


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Derived Forms

  • inˈtrusional, adjective

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Other Words From

  • in·trusion·al adjective

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Word History and Origins

Origin of intrusion1

1250–1300; Middle English < Medieval Latin intrūsiōn- (stem of intrūsiō ), equivalent to Latin intrūs ( us ), past participle of intrūdere to intrude (equivalent to intrūd- verb stem + -tus past participle suffix, with dt < s ) + -iōn- -ion

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Example Sentences

The sounds dipped into the range of human hearing only when a flyby visitor made a quick intrusion.

Even the most focused of stage actors can be rattled by an unexpected intrusion, such as an errant ringtone or overzealous audience murmuring.

On top of this political intrusion, our country’s core health institutions have suffered repeated controversies, reversals, and misinterpretation of evidence, which, in turn, have eroded the public’s confidence.

From Fortune

None of the companies paid the ransom but the conspiracy did cost them because of the intrusion and release of data, federal prosecutor Laura Kathleen Bernstein said.

From Fortune

He shouted about restrictions being intrusions on citizens’ Fourth Amendment rights during a Broward County news conference.

From Fortune

Markets break people out of one kind of intimate intrusion, then involve them in another, in which work tells you who to be.

Now we require safe rooms on steroids, not only protected from physical but technological intrusion.

And while big celebrities loath its intrusion and sloppiness with facts, those chasing fame long to be in its pages.

Joe Barton of Texas, one of the less bright bulbs in Congress, denounced the standard as yet another intrusion.

It was partly the wish for a right to privacy from unwarranted government intrusion that set in motion the American Revolution.

True, in such a case as this, "economic strength" would probably be broken down by the intrusion of physical violence.

Now, the intrusion of a definite, uncontorted memory was evidence of returning cerebral activity.

The caesural pause comes after Ector, which might allow the intrusion of the word of before king.

The ladder still leaning against the wall outside would reveal his intrusion.

It held him on the threshold, unmoved by the rushing assault and lacerating bark of the little dog, who resented his intrusion.

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Intruder in the Dustintrusive