launch

1
[ lawnch, lahnch ]
/ lɔntʃ, lɑntʃ /

verb (used with object)

verb (used without object)

to burst out or plunge boldly or directly into action, speech, etc.
to start out or forth; push out or put forth on the water.

noun

the act of launching.

Origin of launch

1
1300–50; late Middle English launche < Anglo-French lancher < Late Latin lanceāre to wield a lance; see lance1

Related forms

launch·a·ble, adjectiveun·launched, adjectivewell-launched, adjective

Definition for launch (2 of 2)

launch

2
[ lawnch, lahnch ]
/ lɔntʃ, lɑntʃ /

noun

a heavy open or half-decked boat propelled by oars or by an engine.
a large utility boat carried by a warship.

Origin of launch

2
1690–1700; < Spanish, Portuguese lancha, earlier Portuguese lanchara, first attested in 1515 in an account of boats encountered near the Strait of Malacca; of unclear orig.; neither Malay lancar “swift” nor Rom outcomes of Late Latin lanceāre (see launch1) are fully convincing as sources; modern Malay lanca is < Portuguese
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for launch

British Dictionary definitions for launch (1 of 2)

launch

1
/ (lɔːntʃ) /

verb

noun

an act or instance of launching

Word Origin for launch

C14: from Anglo-French lancher, from Late Latin lanceāre to use a lance, hence, to set in motion. See lance

British Dictionary definitions for launch (2 of 2)

launch

2
/ (lɔːntʃ) /

noun

a motor driven boat used chiefly as a transport boat
the largest of the boats of a man-of-war

Word Origin for launch

C17: via Spanish lancha and Portuguese from Malay lancharan boat, from lanchar speed
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012