legion

[ lee-juhn ]
/ ˈli dʒən /

noun

a division of the Roman army, usually comprising 3000 to 6000 soldiers.
a military or semimilitary unit.
any large group of armed men.
any great number of persons or things; multitude.

adjective

very great in number: The holy man's faithful followers were legion.

QUIZZES

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Which of the options below is the best punctuation for the sentence? It__s your turn to pick the movie __ but your sister gets to pick the board game we _ re going to play.

Origin of legion

1175–1225; Middle English legi(o)un (< Old French) < Latin legiōn- (stem of legiō) picked body of soldiers, equivalent to leg(ere) to gather, choose, read + -iōn- -ion
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for legion

British Dictionary definitions for legion

legion
/ (ˈliːdʒən) /

noun

a military unit of the ancient Roman army made up of infantry with supporting cavalry, numbering some three to six thousand men
any large military forcethe French Foreign Legion
(usually capital) an association of ex-servicementhe British Legion
(often plural) any very large number, esp of people

adjective

(usually postpositive) very large or numerous

Word Origin for legion

C13: from Old French, from Latin legio, from legere to choose
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012