leverage

[lev-er-ij, lee-ver-]

noun

verb (used with object), lev·er·aged, lev·er·ag·ing.


Origin of leverage

First recorded in 1715–25; lever + -age
Related formsnon·lev·er·aged, adjectiveun·lev·er·aged, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for leverage

Contemporary Examples of leverage

Historical Examples of leverage

  • When these had been fastened together and set up, and the leverage wheel removed, they went away.

  • Against the leverage of those powerful hind legs he could do nothing.

  • This means an increased leverage, so that the longer the screwdriver, the greater the leverage.

    Handwork in Wood

    William Noyes

  • With regard to leverage, there is a practical unanimity of opinion amongst modern oarsmen.

    Rowing

    Rudolf Chambers Lehmann

  • The leverage was very great, but Rance brought the boat about and headed her for the town nearly three miles away.



British Dictionary definitions for leverage

leverage

noun

the action of a lever
the mechanical advantage gained by employing a lever
power to accomplish something; strategic advantage
the enhanced power available to a large companythe supermarket chains have greater leverage than single-outlet enterprises
US word for gearing (def. 3)
the use made by a company of its limited assets to guarantee the substantial loans required to finance its business
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for leverage
n.

1724, "action of a lever," from lever (n.) + -age. Meaning "power or force of a lever" is from 1827; figurative sense from 1858. The financial sense is attested by 1933, American English; as a verb by 1956. Related: Leveraged; leverages; leveraging.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Culture definitions for leverage

leverage

The amount in which a purchase is paid for in borrowed money. The greater the leverage, the greater the possible gain or potential loss.

The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.