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long-form

or long·form

[ lawng-fawrm, long‐ ]
/ ˈlɔŋˌfɔrm, ˈlɒŋ‐ /
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adjective
noting or relating to journalistic content or a genre of journalism characterized by stories or essays that are several thousand words long, typically combining factual reporting with a narrative and empathetic style: A long-form article can illuminate and humanize your subject.
noting or relating to other types of print or visual media content characterized by in-depth, lengthy narratives: a long-form TV drama whose story unfolds over ten episodes; long-form comics and graphic novels.
noun
journalistic or other media content so characterized: I've started writing more long-form on my blog.

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“Was” is used for the indicative past tense of “to be,” and “were” is only used for the subjunctive past tense.

Origin of long-form

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use long-form in a sentence

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