march

1
[ mahrch ]
/ mɑrtʃ /

verb (used without object)

verb (used with object)

to cause to march.

noun

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Idioms for march

Origin of march

1
1375–1425; late Middle English marchen < Middle French march(i)er, Old French marchier to tread, move < Frankish *markōn presumably, to mark, pace out (a boundary); see mark1

Definition for marching (2 of 2)

march2
[ mahrch ]
/ mɑrtʃ /

noun

a tract of land along a border of a country; frontier.
marches, the border districts between England and Scotland, or England and Wales.

verb (used without object)

to touch at the border; border.

Origin of march

2
1250–1300; Middle English marche < Anglo-French, Old French < Germanic; compare Old English gemearc, Gothic marka boundary; see mark1
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for marching

British Dictionary definitions for marching (1 of 5)

March1
/ (mɑːtʃ) /

noun

the third month of the year, consisting of 31 days

Word Origin for March

from Old French, from Latin Martius (month) of Mars

British Dictionary definitions for marching (2 of 5)

March2
/ (març) /

noun

the German name for the Morava (def. 1)

British Dictionary definitions for marching (3 of 5)

MArch

abbreviation for

Master of Architecture

British Dictionary definitions for marching (4 of 5)

march1
/ (mɑːtʃ) /

verb

noun

Derived forms of march

marcher, noun

Word Origin for march

C16: from Old French marchier to tread, probably of Germanic origin; compare Old English mearcian to mark 1

British Dictionary definitions for marching (5 of 5)

march2
/ (mɑːtʃ) /

noun

Also called: marchland a frontier, border, or boundary or the land lying along it, often of disputed ownership

verb

(intr; often foll by upon or with) to share a common border (with)

Word Origin for march

C13: from Old French marche, from Germanic; related to mark 1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with marching

march

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.