mortify

[ mawr-tuh-fahy ]
/ ˈmɔr təˌfaɪ /

verb (used with object), mor·ti·fied, mor·ti·fy·ing.

to humiliate or shame, as by injury to one's pride or self-respect.
to subjugate (the body, passions, etc.) by abstinence, ascetic discipline, or self-inflicted suffering.
Pathology. to affect with gangrene or necrosis.

verb (used without object), mor·ti·fied, mor·ti·fy·ing.

to practice mortification or disciplinary austerities.
Pathology. to undergo mortification; become gangrened or necrosed.

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Origin of mortify

1350–1400; Middle English mortifien <Middle French mortifier <Late Latin mortificāre “to put to death,” equivalent to Latin morti- (stem of mors ) “death” + -ficāre -fy

synonym study for mortify

1. See ashamed.

OTHER WORDS FROM mortify

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for mortify

British Dictionary definitions for mortify

mortify
/ (ˈmɔːtɪˌfaɪ) /

verb -fies, -fying or -fied

(tr) to humiliate or cause to feel shame
(tr) Christianity to subdue and bring under control by self-denial, disciplinary exercises, etc
(intr) to undergo tissue death or become gangrenous

Derived forms of mortify

mortifier, nounmortifying, adjectivemortifyingly, adverb

Word Origin for mortify

C14: via Old French from Church Latin mortificāre to put to death, from Latin mors death + facere to do
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for mortify

mortify
[ môrtə-fī′ ]

v.

To undergo mortification; to become gangrenous or to necrotize.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.