naughty

[ naw-tee ]
/ ˈnɔ ti /

adjective, naugh·ti·er, naugh·ti·est.

disobedient; mischievous (used especially in speaking to or about children): Weren't we naughty not to eat our spinach?
improper, tasteless, indecorous, or indecent: a naughty word.
Obsolete. wicked; evil.

Nearby words

  1. naucratis,
  2. naufragous,
  3. naugahyde,
  4. naugatuck,
  5. naught,
  6. naughty nineties,
  7. naughty step,
  8. naumachia,
  9. naumachy,
  10. naumannite

Origin of naughty

Middle English word dating back to 1350–1400; see origin at naught, -y1

Related formsnaugh·ti·ly, adverbnaugh·ti·ness, noun

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for naughty


British Dictionary definitions for naughty

naughty

/ (ˈnɔːtɪ) /

adjective -tier or -tiest

(esp of children or their behaviour) mischievous or disobedient; bad
mildly indecent; titillating

noun plural -ties

Australian and NZ slang an act of sexual intercourse
Derived Formsnaughtily, adverbnaughtiness, noun

Word Origin for naughty

C14 (originally: needy, of poor quality): from naught

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for naughty

naughty

adj.

late 14c., naugti "needy, having nothing," from Old English nawiht (see naught) + -y (2). Sense of "wicked, evil, morally wrong" is attested from 1520s; specific meaning "sexually promiscuous" is from 1869. The more tame main modern sense of "disobedient" (especially of children) is attested from 1630s. Related: Naughtily; naughtiness. A woman of bad character c.1530-1750 might be called a naughty pack (also sometimes of men and later of children).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper