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pamphlet

[ pam-flit ]
/ ˈpæm flɪt /
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noun

a complete publication of generally less than 80 pages stitched or stapled together and usually having a paper cover.
a short treatise or essay, generally a controversial tract, on some subject of contemporary interest: a political pamphlet.

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Origin of pamphlet

1375–1425; late Middle English pamflet<Anglo-Latin panfletus, pamfletus, syncopated variant of Pamphiletus, diminutive of Medieval Latin Pamphilus, title of a 12th-century Latin comedy. See -et

OTHER WORDS FROM pamphlet

pam·phlet·ar·y, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

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British Dictionary definitions for pamphlet

pamphlet
/ (ˈpæmflɪt) /

noun

a brief publication generally having a paper cover; booklet
a brief treatise, often on a subject of current interest, published in pamphlet form

Word Origin for pamphlet

C14 pamflet, from Anglo-Latin panfletus, from Medieval Latin Pamphilus title of a popular 12th-century amatory poem from Greek Pamphilos masculine proper name
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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