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pansophy

[ pan-suh-fee ]
/ ˈpæn sə fi /
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See synonyms for: pansophy / pansophical / pansophic on Thesaurus.com

noun

universal wisdom or knowledge.

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Origin of pansophy

First recorded in 1635–45; pan- + -sophy

OTHER WORDS FROM pansophy

pan·soph·ic [pan-sof-ik], /pænˈsɒf ɪk/, pan·soph·i·cal, adjectivepan·soph·i·cal·ly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use pansophy in a sentence

  • All sciences there shall be one pansophy; and all things knowable shall appear to you in their wondrous, perfect harmony.

  • A short account of the Via Lucis will be my only attempt to elucidate the mysteries of "pansophy."

  • Further study of Komenský's works on pansophy has not given me a higher opinion of their value.

  • Philosophy she lacked, but theosophy, which is a pansophy, she possessed—when she did not need it.

    The Paliser case|Edgar Saltus

British Dictionary definitions for pansophy

pansophy
/ (ˈpænsəfɪ) /

noun

universal knowledge

Derived forms of pansophy

pansophic (pænˈsɒfɪk) or pansophical, adjectivepansophically, adverb

Word Origin for pansophy

C17: from New Latin pansophia; see pan-, -sophy
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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