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View synonyms for pathos

pathos

[ pey-thos, -thohs, -thaws ]

noun

  1. the quality or power in an actual life experience or in literature, music, speech, or other forms of expression, of evoking a feeling of pity, or of sympathetic and kindly sorrow or compassion.
  2. Obsolete. suffering.


pathos

/ ˈpeɪθɒs /

noun

  1. the quality or power, esp in literature or speech, of arousing feelings of pity, sorrow, etc
  2. a feeling of sympathy or pity

    a stab of pathos



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Word History and Origins

Origin of pathos1

First recorded in 1570–80; from Greek páthos “suffering, sensation, experience,” akin to páschein “to suffer, feel, be affected”; pathetic ( def )

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Word History and Origins

Origin of pathos1

C17: from Greek: suffering; related to penthos sorrow

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Compare Meanings

How does pathos compare to similar and commonly confused words? Explore the most common comparisons:

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Example Sentences

Hall is another highlight, endowing an underwritten woman-scorned character with some real pathos.

From Time

They all moved from plot point to plot point and from pathos to comedy with few punches or punchlines landing.

From Time

In the celebrated mad scene concluding the first act, for example, once she is stricken she is totally enveloped by the pathos of her situation.

The shock value is high, but so is the level of pathos imbued in Krauze’s text.

From Time

Everywhere DakhaBrakha has played, fans have rhapsodized about the joy and pathos in their music.

Dickens was a master of heart-wrenching pathos because he felt every pain as he wrote.

This movie and the novel are a beautiful blend of pathos and comedy.

Braff is striving to convey a poignant blend of pathos and humor here, but his sort of striving is a form of cheating.

And the first two episodes were directed by Peter Berg of Friday Night Lights, who is a master of small-town pathos.

Once edgily shocking, the show now feels rich with pathos and poignancy.

There are others who disclose a special susceptibility to the more simple effects of pathos.

He is a funny figure, you say; but, by your leave, it seems to me that he is only a figure of a very great pathos.

Thomas Westfield died; a learned English divine, whose eloquence and pathos procured him the appellation of the weeping prophet.

Few poets have united as he has, delicate pathos and comic force, pure rêverie and the sense of the grotesque.

There was a touching pathos in Jakey's voice as he sang, and it was intensified when he asked, "Doan' you 'member me, honey?"

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pathophysiologypathosis