phlebotomist

[fluh-bot-uh-mist]
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noun Surgery.

a specialist in phlebotomy.
a nurse or other health worker trained in drawing venous blood for testing or donation.

Origin of phlebotomist

First recorded in 1650–60; phlebotom(y) + -ist
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for phlebotomist

Historical Examples of phlebotomist

  • There was a phlebotomist from Pittsburg who had shot all over the earth.

    Pony Tracks

    Frederic Remington

  • I constantly act as phlebotomist to the vanity of the young and to the anecdotage of the senile and senescent.

    The Journal of a Disappointed Man

    Wilhelm Nero Pilate Barbellion

  • Steele tells of a phlebotomist who advertised, for the good of mankind, to bleed at "threepence per head."

    A Book about Doctors

    John Cordy Jeaffreson

  • A famous French Marchal reproved the clumsiness of a phlebotomist in a less gratifying manner.

    A Book about Doctors

    John Cordy Jeaffreson

  • A famous French Marchal reproved the awkwardness of a phlebotomist less agreeably.


Word Origin and History for phlebotomist
n.

1650s, from phlebotomy + -ist. Related: Phlebotomize.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

phlebotomist in Medicine

phlebotomist

[flĭ-bŏtə-mĭst]

n.

One who practices phlebotomy.
One who draws blood for analysis or transfusion.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.