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polity

[ pol-i-tee ]
/ ˈpɒl ɪ ti /
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noun, plural pol·i·ties.

a particular form or system of government: civil polity; ecclesiastical polity.
the condition of being constituted as a state or other organized community or body: The polity of ancient Athens became a standard for later governments.
government or administrative regulation: The colonists demanded independence in matters of internal polity.
a state or other organized community or body.

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Origin of polity

1530–40; <Latin polītīa<Greek polīteía citizenship, government, form of government, commonwealth, equivalent to polī́te-, variant stem of polī́tēs citizen (see polis, -ite1) + -ia-ia

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH polity

policy, polity
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use polity in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for polity

polity
/ (ˈpɒlɪtɪ) /

noun plural -ties

a form of government or organization of a state, church, society, etc; constitution
a politically organized society, state, city, etc
the management of public or civil affairs
political organization

Word Origin for polity

C16: from Latin polītīa, from Greek politeia citizenship, civil administration, from politēs citizen, from polis city
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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