preceding

[ pri-see-ding ]
/ prɪˈsi dɪŋ /

adjective

that precedes; previous: Refer back to the footnote on the preceding page.

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Origin of preceding

First recorded in 1485–95; precede + -ing2

Definition for preceding (2 of 2)

precede
[ pri-seed ]
/ prɪˈsid /

verb (used with object), pre·ced·ed, pre·ced·ing.

to go before, as in place, order, rank, importance, or time.
to introduce by something preliminary; preface: to precede one's statement with a qualification.

verb (used without object), pre·ced·ed, pre·ced·ing.

to go or come before.

noun

Journalism. copy printed at the beginning of a news story presenting late bulletins, editorial notes, or prefatory remarks.

Origin of precede

1325–75; Middle English preceden < Latin praecēdere. See pre-, cede

OTHER WORDS FROM precede

pre·ced·a·ble, adjectiveun·pre·ced·ed, adjective

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH precede

precede proceed
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for preceding

British Dictionary definitions for preceding (1 of 2)

preceding
/ (prɪˈsiːdɪŋ) /

adjective

(prenominal) going or coming before; former

British Dictionary definitions for preceding (2 of 2)

precede
/ (prɪˈsiːd) /

verb

to go or be before (someone or something) in time, place, rank, etc
(tr) to preface or introduce

Word Origin for precede

C14: via Old French from Latin praecēdere to go before, from prae before + cēdere to move
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012