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propeller

[ pruh-pel-er ]
/ prəˈpɛl ər /
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SEE MORE SYNONYMS FOR propeller ON THESAURUS.COM

noun

a device having a revolving hub with radiating blades, for propelling an airplane, ship, etc.
a person or thing that propels.
the bladed rotor of a pump that drives the fluid axially.
a wind-driven, usually three-bladed, device that provides mechanical energy, as for driving an electric alternator in wind plants.

RELATED WORDS

screw, driver, paddle, prop, fan, fin, oar

Nearby words

proparoxytone, propecia, propel, propellant, propellent, propeller, propeller head, propeller horsepower, propeller shaft, propeller wash, propelling pencil

Origin of propeller

First recorded in 1770–80; propel + -er1
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for propeller

British Dictionary definitions for propeller

propeller

/ (prəˈpɛlə) /

noun

a device having blades radiating from a central hub that is rotated to produce thrust to propel a ship, aircraft, etc
a person or thing that propels
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for propeller

propeller


n.

1780, "anything that propels," agent noun from propel. In mechanical sense, 1809, of ships; of flying machines (in a broad, theoretical sense) 1842, in the specific modern sense 1853.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Science definitions for propeller

propeller

[ prə-pĕlər ]

A device consisting of a set of two or more twisted, airfoil-shaped blades mounted around a shaft and spun to provide propulsion of a vehicle through water or air, or to cause fluid flow, as in a pump. The lift generated by the spinning blades provides the force that propels the vehicle or the fluid-the lift does not have to result in an actual upward force; its direction is simply parallel to the rotating shaft.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.