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Idioms about punch

    pull punches,
    1. to lessen deliberately the force of one's blows.
    2. Informal. to act with restraint or hold back the full force or implications of something: He wasn't going to pull any punches when he warned them of what they would be up against.
    roll with the punches, Informal. to cope with and survive adversity: In the business world you quickly learn to roll with the punches.

Origin of punch

1
First recorded in 1350–1400; Middle English verb pouncen, pounson, punchen “to emboss (metal), pierce, prick,” from Old French poinçoner, poinssonner, ponchonner “to emboss”; see also puncheon2

OTHER WORDS FROM punch

puncher, noun

Other definitions for punch (2 of 4)

punch2
[ puhnch ]
/ pʌntʃ /

noun
a tool or machine for perforating or stamping materials, driving nails, etc.
the solid upper die of a punch press, used with a hollow die to blank out shaped pieces of sheet metal or the like.
verb (used with object)
to cut, stamp, pierce, perforate, form, or drive with a tool or machine that punches.
verb (used without object)
to work at or on something with or as if with a mechanical punch.

Origin of punch

2
First recorded in 1495–1505; short for puncheon2, reinforced by punch1

OTHER WORDS FROM punch

punch·a·ble, adjective

Other definitions for punch (3 of 4)

punch3
[ puhnch ]
/ pʌntʃ /

noun
a beverage consisting of wine or spirits mixed with fruit juice, soda, water, milk, or the like, and flavored with sugar, spices, etc.
a beverage of two or more fruit juices, sugar, and water, sometimes carbonated.

Origin of punch

3
First recorded in 1625–35; of uncertain origin; traditionally derived from Hindi panch “five” (from the number of ingredients), from Sanskrit panca; cf. five

Other definitions for punch (4 of 4)

Punch
[ puhnch ]
/ pʌntʃ /

noun
the chief male character in a Punch-and-Judy show.

Origin of Punch

Short for Punchinello
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use punch in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for punch (1 of 4)

punch1
/ (pʌntʃ) /

verb
to strike blows (at), esp with a clenched fist
(tr) Western US to herd or drive (cattle), esp for a living
(tr) to poke or prod with a stick or similar object
punch above one's weight to do something that is considered to be beyond one's ability
noun

Derived forms of punch

puncher, noun

Word Origin for punch

C15: perhaps a variant of pounce ²

British Dictionary definitions for punch (2 of 4)

punch2
/ (pʌntʃ) /

noun
verb
(tr) to pierce, cut, stamp, shape, or drive with a punch

Word Origin for punch

C14: shortened from puncheon, from Old French ponçon; see puncheon ²

British Dictionary definitions for punch (3 of 4)

punch3
/ (pʌntʃ) /

noun
any mixed drink containing fruit juice and, usually, alcoholic liquor, generally hot and spiced

Word Origin for punch

C17: perhaps from Hindi pānch, from Sanskrit pañca five; the beverage originally included five ingredients

British Dictionary definitions for punch (4 of 4)

Punch
/ (pʌntʃ) /

noun
the main character in the traditional children's puppet show Punch and Judy
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Other Idioms and Phrases with punch

punch

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
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