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View synonyms for punch

punch

1

[ puhnch ]

noun

  1. a thrusting blow, especially with the fist.
  2. forcefulness, effectiveness, or pungency in content or appeal; vigor; zest:

    This ad copy you wrote isn't bad, but it needs more punch.



verb (used with object)

  1. to give a sharp thrust or blow to, especially with the fist.

    Synonyms: pummel, drub, hit, strike

  2. Western U.S. and Western Canada. to drive (cattle).
  3. to poke or prod, as with a stick.
  4. Informal. to deliver (lines in a play, a musical passage, or the like) with vigor.
  5. to strike or hit in operating:

    She punched the elevator button and waited for the doors to open.

  6. to put into operation with or as if with a blow:

    I punched the time clock at that factory every morning and evening for 35 years.

  7. Baseball. to hit (the ball) with a short, chopping motion rather than with a full swing:

    He punched a soft liner just over third base for a base hit.

verb (used without object)

  1. to give a sharp blow to a person or thing, as with the fist:

    The boxer punches well.

verb phrase

    1. to record one's time of arrival at work by punching a time clock.
    2. to keyboard (information) into a computer:

      I was punching in the inventory figures when the system crashed.

    1. to call up (information) on a computer by the use of a keyboard:

      She punched up a list of hotel reservations.

    2. Informal. to enliven, as with fresh ideas or additional material:

      You'd better punch up that speech with a few jokes.

  1. Informal. to keep trying or working, especially in difficult or discouraging circumstances; persevere:

    How long have you been punching away at the same old job?

    1. to record one's time of departure from work by punching a time clock.
    2. Slang. to beat up or knock out with the fists.
    3. to extract (information) from a computer by the use of a keyboard:

      This function lets you quickly punch out a report when sales audit time comes along.

    4. to bail out; eject from an aircraft.

punch

2

[ puhnch ]

noun

  1. a tool or machine for perforating or stamping materials, driving nails, etc.
  2. the solid upper die of a punch press, used with a hollow die to blank out shaped pieces of sheet metal or the like.

verb (used with object)

  1. to cut, stamp, pierce, perforate, form, or drive with a tool or machine that punches.

verb (used without object)

  1. to work at or on something with or as if with a mechanical punch.

punch

3

[ puhnch ]

noun

  1. a beverage consisting of wine or spirits mixed with fruit juice, soda, water, milk, or the like, and flavored with sugar, spices, etc.
  2. a beverage of two or more fruit juices, sugar, and water, sometimes carbonated.

Punch

4

[ puhnch ]

noun

  1. the chief male character in a Punch-and-Judy show.

Punch

1

/ pʌntʃ /

noun

  1. the main character in the traditional children's puppet show Punch and Judy


punch

2

/ pʌntʃ /

verb

  1. to strike blows (at), esp with a clenched fist
  2. tr to herd or drive (cattle), esp for a living
  3. tr to poke or prod with a stick or similar object
  4. punch above one's weight
    punch above one's weight to do something that is considered to be beyond one's ability

noun

  1. a blow with the fist
  2. informal.
    telling force, point, or vigour

    his arguments lacked punch

  3. See pull
    pull one's punches
    pull one's punches See pull

punch

3

/ pʌntʃ /

noun

  1. a tool or machine for piercing holes in a material
  2. any of various tools used for knocking a bolt, rivet, etc, out of a hole
  3. a tool or machine used for stamping a design on something or shaping it by impact
  4. the solid die of a punching machine for cutting, stamping, or shaping material
  5. computing a device, such as a card punch or tape punch, used for making holes in a card or paper tape

verb

  1. tr to pierce, cut, stamp, shape, or drive with a punch

punch

4

/ pʌntʃ /

noun

  1. any mixed drink containing fruit juice and, usually, alcoholic liquor, generally hot and spiced

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Derived Forms

  • ˈpuncher, noun

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Other Words From

  • puncher noun

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Word History and Origins

Origin of punch1

First recorded in 1350–1400; Middle English verb pouncen, pounson, punchen “to emboss (metal), pierce, prick,” from Old French poinçoner, poinssonner, ponchonner “to emboss”; puncheon 2

Origin of punch2

First recorded in 1495–1505; short for puncheon 2, reinforced by punch 1

Origin of punch3

First recorded in 1625–35; of uncertain origin; traditionally derived from Hindi panch “five” (from the number of ingredients), from Sanskrit panca; five ( def )

Origin of punch4

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Word History and Origins

Origin of punch1

C15: perhaps a variant of pounce ²

Origin of punch2

C14: shortened from puncheon, from Old French ponçon; see puncheon ²

Origin of punch3

C17: perhaps from Hindi pānch, from Sanskrit pañca five; the beverage originally included five ingredients

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Idioms and Phrases

Idioms
  1. pleased as Punch, highly pleased; delighted:

    They were pleased as Punch at having been asked to come along.

  2. pull punches,
    1. to lessen deliberately the force of one's blows.
    2. Informal. to act with restraint or hold back the full force or implications of something:

      He wasn't going to pull any punches when he warned them of what they would be up against.

  3. roll with the punches, Informal. to cope with and survive adversity:

    In the business world you quickly learn to roll with the punches.

More idioms and phrases containing punch

  • beat to it (the punch)
  • can't punch one's way out of a paper bag
  • pack a punch
  • pleased as punch
  • pull no punches
  • roll with the punches
  • sucker punch
  • throw a punch

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Example Sentences

Indeed, adds Ives, the S&P snub is “a gut punch to the bulls.”

From Fortune

This started as a notch-shaped cutout, and companies have lately worked that down to a single circle that looks like someone took a hole punch tool to the display.

The coronavirus hit the fashion industry with a tough combination of punches.

From Digiday

Insects pack a nutritional punch, in part because they’re full of protein.

Cameron pulls few punches in his descriptions of world leaders — Vladimir Putin, for instance.

Like Mike Tyson says, you have a great fight plan until you come out and take the first punch.

“Ordinarily, you see punch-counterpunch-punch,” as the attacked party tries to fend off the intruder, the former official said.

“You might as well punch yourself in the face,” he says when asked if he read about any of the controversy.

And while all he says he has spoken to still believe the interrogations saved lives, he said the report was a punch in the gut.

A squad soon arrived to take him away, and I saw the sergeant punch him in the face even though he went quietly.

Never had Punch secured the telling of that tale with so little opposition.

But Punch was five; and he knew that going to England would be much nicer than a trip to Nassick.

Punch scratched himself in his sleep, and Judy moaned a little.

At the end of the first day Punch demanded to be set down in England, which he was certain must be close at hand.

"Yes," said Punch, lifted up in his father's arms to wave good-bye.

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Definitions and idiom definitions from Dictionary.com Unabridged, based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2023

Idioms from The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.

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puncePunch-and-Judy show