recapitulate

[ ree-kuh-pich-uh-leyt ]
/ ˌri kəˈpɪtʃ əˌleɪt /

verb (used with object), re·ca·pit·u·lated, re·ca·pit·u·lat·ing.

to review by a brief summary, as at the end of a speech or discussion; summarize.
Biology. (of an organism) to repeat (ancestral evolutionary stages) in its development.
Music. to restate (the exposition) in a sonata-form movement.

verb (used without object), re·ca·pit·u·lated, re·ca·pit·u·lat·ing.

to sum up statements or matters.

QUIZZES

DO YOU KNOW THIS VOCABULARY FROM "THE HANDMAID'S TALE"?

"The Handmaid's Tale" was required reading for many of us in school. Everyone else has probably watched the very popular and addictive TV show. Do you remember this vocabulary from the book, and do you know what these terms mean?
Question 1 of 10
decorum

Origin of recapitulate

1560–70; < Late Latin recapitulātus (past participle of recapitulāre), equivalent to re- re- + capitulātus; see capitulate

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH recapitulate

capitulate recapitulate
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for recapitulate

British Dictionary definitions for recapitulate

recapitulate
/ (ˌriːkəˈpɪtjʊˌleɪt) /

verb

to restate the main points of (an argument, speech, etc); summarize
(tr) (of an animal) to repeat (stages of its evolutionary development) during the embryonic stages of its life
to repeat at some point during a piece of music (material used earlier in the same work)

Derived forms of recapitulate

recapitulative or recapitulatory, adjective

Word Origin for recapitulate

C16: from Late Latin recapitulāre, literally: to put back under headings; see capitulate
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012