recite

[ri-sahyt]
verb (used with object), re·cit·ed, re·cit·ing.
  1. to repeat the words of, as from memory, especially in a formal manner: to recite a lesson.
  2. to repeat (a piece of poetry or prose) before an audience, as for entertainment.
  3. to give an account of: to recite one's adventures.
  4. to enumerate.
verb (used without object), re·cit·ed, re·cit·ing.
  1. to recite a lesson or part of a lesson for a teacher.
  2. to recite or repeat something from memory.

Origin of recite

1400–50; late Middle English reciten < Latin recitāre to read aloud, equivalent to re- re- + citāre to summon, cite1
Related formsre·cit·a·ble, adjectivere·cit·er, nounpre·re·cite, verb (used with object), pre·re·cit·ed, pre·re·cit·ing.un·re·cit·ed, adjectivewell-re·cit·ed, adjective

Synonyms for recite

3. narrate, describe. See relate. 4. count, number, detail.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


Examples from the Web for recites

Contemporary Examples of recites

Historical Examples of recites

  • And these are the sort of old wives' tales which he sings and recites to us, and we are obliged to listen to him.

    Lysis

    Plato

  • There is one blind girl who recites most perfectly and eagerly.

  • Every one recites the number of enemies whom he has conquered.

    Perils and Captivity

    Charlotte-Adlade [ne Picard] Dard

  • Such is the race of which Liszt recites the epic in the "Hungarian Rhapsodies."

    The Pianolist

    Gustav Kobb

  • Bring your dolls along and arrange your groups, while Effie recites.

    Armorel of Lyonesse

    Walter Besant


British Dictionary definitions for recites

recite

verb
  1. to repeat (a poem, passage, etc) aloud from memory before an audience, teacher, etc
  2. (tr) to give a detailed account of
  3. (tr) to enumerate (examples, etc)
Derived Formsrecitable, adjectivereciter, noun

Word Origin for recite

C15: from Latin recitāre to cite again, from re- + citāre to summon; see cite
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for recites

recite

v.

early 15c., from Old French reciter (12c.) and directly from Latin recitare "read aloud, read out, repeat from memory, declaim," from re- "back, again" (see re-) + citare "to summon" (see cite). Related: Recited; reciting.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper