QUIZZES

DON’T VACILLATE! VANQUISH THIS WORD OF THE DAY QUIZ!

It’d be a real faux pas to miss this quiz on the words from August 3–9, 2020!
Question 1 of 7
What does “vacillate” mean?

Origin of rescue

First recorded in 1300–50; Middle English verb rescuen, from Old French rescourre, equivalent to re- + escourre “to shake, drive out, remove,” from Latin excutere (ex- + -cutere, combining form of quatere “to shake”); see origin at re-, ex-1

OTHER WORDS FROM rescue

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for rescue

British Dictionary definitions for rescue

rescue
/ (ˈrɛskjuː) /

verb -cues, -cuing or -cued (tr)

to bring (someone or something) out of danger, attack, harm, etc; deliver or save
to free (a person) from legal custody by force
law to seize (goods or property) by force

noun

  1. the act or an instance of rescuing
  2. (as modifier)a rescue party
the forcible removal of a person from legal custody
law the forcible seizure of goods or property

Derived forms of rescue

rescuable, adjectiverescuer, noun

Word Origin for rescue

C14: rescowen, from Old French rescourre, from re- + escourre to pull away, from Latin excutere to shake off, from quatere to shake
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012