Saxon

[ sak-suh n ]
/ ˈsæk sən /

noun

adjective

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Origin of Saxon

1250–1300; Middle English, probably < Late Latin Saxō, Saxonēs (plural) < Germanic; replacing Old English Seaxan (plural)

OTHER WORDS FROM Saxon

non-Sax·on, noun, adjectivepre-Sax·on, adjective, noun
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Example sentences from the Web for saxon

British Dictionary definitions for saxon

Saxon
/ (ˈsæksən) /

noun

a member of a West Germanic people who in Roman times spread from Schleswig across NW Germany to the Rhine. Saxons raided and settled parts of S Britain in the fifth and sixth centuries ad. In Germany they established a duchy and other dominions, which changed and shifted through the centuries, usually retaining the name Saxony
a native or inhabitant of Saxony
  1. the Low German dialect of Saxony
  2. any of the West Germanic dialects spoken by the ancient Saxons or their descendants

adjective

of, relating to, or characteristic of the ancient Saxons, the Anglo-Saxons, or their descendants
of, relating to, or characteristic of Saxony, its inhabitants, or their Low German dialect

Word Origin for Saxon

C13 (replacing Old English Seaxe): via Old French from Late Latin Saxon-, Saxo, from Greek; of Germanic origin and perhaps related to the name of a knife used by the Saxons; compare saw 1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012