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sewer

1
[ soo-er ]
/ ˈsu ər /
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noun
an artificial conduit, usually underground, for carrying off waste water and refuse, as in a town or city.
verb (used with object)
to provide or equip with sewers: a tax increase necessary to sewer the neighborhood.
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Which of the following words describes “sky blue”?
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Origin of sewer

1
First recorded in 1375–1425; late Middle English suer(e) “drainage ditch,” from dialectal Old French se(u)wiere “overflow channel, pond sluice” (compare Old French ess(e)ouer(e) “ditch”), from unrecorded Vulgar Latin exaquāria “drain for carrying water off,” equivalent to Latin ex- “out of, away” + aquāria “pertaining to water” (feminine singular of aquārius ); see -ary, -er2, sew2

OTHER WORDS FROM sewer

sew·er·less, adjectivesew·er·like, adjective

Other definitions for sewer (2 of 3)

sewer2
[ soh-er ]
/ ˈsoʊ ər /

noun
a person or thing that sews.

Origin of sewer

2
First recorded in 1350–1400; Middle English sewer(e), souere, sower; sew1, -er1

Other definitions for sewer (3 of 3)

sewer3
[ soo-er ]
/ ˈsu ər /

noun
a former household officer or head servant in charge of the service of the table.

Origin of sewer

3
First recorded in 1350–1400; Middle English sever(e), sewerer “attendant who served or tasted his master's food,” shortened form of Anglo-French asseour “one who sets the table, seater,” equivalent to Old French asse(oir) “to seat” (from Latin assidēre “to attend upon”) + -our; see assiduous, -or2)
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use sewer in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for sewer (1 of 3)

sewer1
/ (ˈsuːə) /

noun
a drain or pipe, esp one that is underground, used to carry away surface water or sewage
verb
(tr) to provide with sewers

Word Origin for sewer

C15: from Old French esseveur, from essever to drain, from Vulgar Latin exaquāre (unattested), from Latin ex- 1 + aqua water

British Dictionary definitions for sewer (2 of 3)

sewer2
/ (ˈsəʊə) /

noun
a person or thing that sews

British Dictionary definitions for sewer (3 of 3)

sewer3
/ (ˈsuːə) /

noun
(in medieval England) a servant of high rank in charge of the serving of meals and the seating of guests

Word Origin for sewer

C14: shortened from Anglo-French asseour, from Old French asseoir to cause to sit, from Latin assidēre, from sedēre to sit
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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