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signatory

[ sig-nuh-tawr-ee, -tohr-ee ]
/ ˈsɪg nəˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i /
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adjective
having signed, or joined in signing, a document: the signatory powers to a treaty.
noun, plural sig·na·to·ries.
a signer, or one of the signers, of a document: France and Holland were among the signatories of the treaty.
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Origin of signatory

1640–50, in earlier sense “used in affixing seals”; 1860–65 for def. 2; <Latin signātōrius of, belonging to sealing, equivalent to signā(re) to mark, seal (see sign) + -tōrius-tory1

OTHER WORDS FROM signatory

non·sig·na·to·ry, adjective, noun, plural non·sig·na·to·ries.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use signatory in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for signatory

signatory
/ (ˈsɪɡnətərɪ, -trɪ) /

noun plural -ries
a person who has signed a document such as a treaty or contract or an organization, state, etc, on whose behalf such a document has been signed
adjective
having signed a document, treaty, etc

Word Origin for signatory

C17: from Latin signātōrius concerning sealing, from signāre to seal, from signum a mark
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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