Advertisement

Advertisement

spectroscopy

[ spek-tros-kuh-pee, spek-truh-skoh-pee ]

noun

  1. the science that deals with the use of the spectroscope and with spectrum analysis.


spectroscopy

/ spɛkˈtrɒskəpɪ /

noun

  1. the science and practice of using spectrometers and spectroscopes and of analysing spectra, the methods employed depending on the radiation being examined. The techniques are widely used in chemical analysis and in studies of the properties of atoms, molecules, ions, etc


spectroscopy

/ spĕk-trŏskə-pē /

  1. The analysis of spectra, especially light or mass spectra, to determine properties of their source.
  2. ◆ In light or optical spectroscopy , the spectrum of a light source is analyzed through a spectroscope to determine atomic composition of a substance. In astronomy, phenomena such as red shift can also be analyzed.
  3. ◆ In mass spectroscopy , a spectroscope is used to determine the composition of ions or charged molecules in a sample. Spectroscopy is also called spectrography.
  4. See also atomic spectrum


spectroscopy

  1. The branch of science devoted to discovering the chemical composition of materials by looking at the light (and other kinds of electromagnetic radiation ) they emit. Scientists use spectroscopy to determine the nature of distant stars and galaxies as well as to identify and monitor the production of products in factories.


Discover More

Derived Forms

  • specˈtroscopist, noun
Discover More

Other Words From

  • spec·tros·co·pist [spek-, tros, -k, uh, -pist], noun
Discover More

Word History and Origins

Origin of spectroscopy1

First recorded in 1865–70; spectro- + -scopy
Discover More

Example Sentences

Coupling adaptive optics with spectroscopy allowed them to measure the full orbit of a star they’d been tracking, called S0-2.

Michelin and colleagues unraveled this mystery using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy.

About 600 minerals are confirmed to glow in the dark, says Glen Waychunas, a mineralogist who studies fluorescence and spectroscopy at the California Institute of Technology.

It would use radar and near-infrared spectroscopy to peer below the planet’s thick clouds and observe the geology and topography of its surface.

It will use spectroscopy to find out what the soil is made of, measure magnetic fields on the ground, and track weather changes like temperature and winds.

One of the most fruitful fields for this instrument is undoubtedly stellar spectroscopy.

Oscar Brasch has within the last few years studied spectroscopy in relation to the alkaloids and organic poisons.

It is to Sir William Huggins, however, that we are indebted for the application of the principle to spectroscopy.

In the earliest days of spectroscopy the spectra of the stars were classified according to their visual spectra.

The basis of spectroscopy is the prism, which separates sunlight into seven colors and projects a band of light called a spectrum.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement


spectroscopic binaryspectrum