supplicate

[suhp-li-keyt]

verb (used without object), sup·pli·cat·ed, sup·pli·cat·ing.

to pray humbly; make humble and earnest entreaty or petition.

verb (used with object), sup·pli·cat·ed, sup·pli·cat·ing.

to pray humbly to; entreat or petition humbly.
to seek or ask for by humble entreaty.

Origin of supplicate

1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin supplicātus (past participle of supplicāre to kneel), equivalent to supplic-, stem of supplex submissive, suppliant (see supple) + -ātus -ate1
Related formssup·pli·cat·ing·ly, adverbsup·pli·ca·to·ry [suhp-li-kuh-tawr-ee, -tohr-ee] /ˈsʌp lɪ kəˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i/, adjectivenon·sup·pli·cat·ing, adjectivepre·sup·pli·cate, verb (used with object), pre·sup·pli·cat·ed, pre·sup·pli·cat·ing.un·sup·pli·cat·ed, adjectiveun·sup·pli·cat·ing, adjectiveun·sup·pli·cat·ing·ly, adverb

Synonyms for supplicate

Synonym study

2. See appeal.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019


Examples from the Web for supplicatory

Historical Examples of supplicatory


British Dictionary definitions for supplicatory

supplicate

verb

to make a humble request to (someone); plead
(tr) to ask for or seek humbly
Derived Formssupplicatory, adjective

Word Origin for supplicate

C15: from Latin supplicāre to beg on one's knees; see supple
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for supplicatory

supplicate

v.

early 15c., from Latin supplicatus, past participle of supplicare (see supplication). Related: Supplicated; supplicating.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper