therapeutics

[ ther-uh-pyoo-tiks ]
/ ˌθɛr əˈpyu tɪks /

noun (used with a singular verb)

the branch of medicine concerned with the remedial treatment of disease.

Origin of therapeutics

First recorded in 1665–75; see origin at therapeutic, -ics

Definition for therapeutics (2 of 2)

therapeutic

[ ther-uh-pyoo-tik ]
/ ˌθɛr əˈpyu tɪk /

adjective Also ther·a·peu·ti·cal.

of or relating to the treating or curing of disease; curative.

noun

a therapeutic substance.

Origin of therapeutic

1535–45; < New Latin therapeuticus < Greek therapeutikós, equivalent to therapeú(ein) to attend, treat medically (akin to therápōn attendant) + -tikos -tic

Related forms

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for therapeutics

British Dictionary definitions for therapeutics (1 of 2)

therapeutics

/ (ˌθɛrəˈpjuːtɪks) /

noun

(functioning as singular) the branch of medicine concerned with the treatment of disease

British Dictionary definitions for therapeutics (2 of 2)

therapeutic

/ (ˌθɛrəˈpjuːtɪk) /

adjective

of or relating to the treatment of disease; curative
serving or performed to maintain healththerapeutic abortion

Derived Forms

therapeutically, adverb

Word Origin for therapeutic

C17: from New Latin therapeuticus, from Greek therapeutikos, from therapeuein to minister to, from theraps an attendant
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medicine definitions for therapeutics (1 of 2)

therapeutics

[ thĕr′ə-pyōōtĭks ]

n.

Medical treatment of disease; the art or science of healing.

Related forms

ther′a•peutist n.

Medicine definitions for therapeutics (2 of 2)

therapeutic

[ thĕr′ə-pyōōtĭk ]

adj.

Having or exhibiting healing powers.
Of or relating to therapeutics.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.