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timbale

[ tim-buhl; for 1, 2 also French tan-bal; Spanish teem-bah-le for 3 ]
/ ˈtɪm bəl; for 1, 2 also French tɛ̃ˈbal; Spanish timˈbɑ lɛ for 3 /
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noun, plural tim·bales [tim-buhlz; for 1, 2 also French tan-bal]. /ˈtɪm bəlz; for 1, 2 also French tɛ̃ˈbal/.

Also tim·bale case . a small shell made of batter, fried usually in a timbale iron.
a preparation, usually richly sauced, of minced meat, fish, or vegetables served in a timbale or other crust.
tim·ba·les. Also called tim·ba·les cre·o·les [Spanish teem-bah-les kre-aw-les]. /Spanish timˈbɑ lɛs krɛˈɔ lɛs/. two conjoined Afro-Cuban drums similar to bongos but wider in diameter and played with drumsticks instead of the hands.

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Origin of timbale

First recorded in 1815–25; from French: literally, “kettledrum”; see origin at timbal
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use timbale in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for timbale

timbale
/ (tæmˈbɑːl, French tɛ̃bal) /

noun

a mixture of meat, fish, etc, in a rich sauce, cooked in a mould lined with potato or pastry
a plain straight-sided mould in which such a dish is prepared

Word Origin for timbale

C19: from French: kettledrum
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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