two

[ too ]
/ tu /

noun

a cardinal number, 1 plus 1.
a symbol for this number, as 2 or II.
a set of this many persons or things.
a playing card, die face, or half of a domino face with two pips.

adjective

amounting to two in number.

Idioms

    in two, into two separate parts, as halves: A bolt of lightning split the tree in two.
    put two and two together, to draw a correct conclusion from the given circumstances; infer: It didn't require a great mind to put two and two together.

Origin of two

before 900; Middle English; Old English twā (feminine and neuter; cf. twain); cognate with German zwei; compare Latin duo, Greek dýo

Can be confused

to too two
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for two

British Dictionary definitions for two

two

/ (tuː) /

noun

determiner

  1. amounting to twotwo nails
  2. (as pronoun)he bought two

Related forms

Related adjectives: binary, double, dualRelated prefixes: di-, bi-

Word Origin for two

Old English twā (feminine); related to Old High German zwā, Old Norse tvau, Latin, Greek duo
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with two

two


In addition to the idioms beginning with two

  • two bits
  • two can play at that game
  • two cents
  • two left feet, have
  • two of a kind
  • two shakes of a lamb's tail
  • two strikes against
  • two strings to one's bow
  • two ways about it
  • two wrongs do not make a right

also see:

  • fall between the crack (two stools)
  • for two cents
  • game that two can play
  • goody-two-shoes
  • in two shakes
  • it takes two
  • kill two birds with one stone
  • know all the answers (a thing or two)
  • lesser of two evils
  • like as two peas in a pod
  • no two ways about it
  • of two minds
  • put two and two together
  • that makes two of us
  • thing or two
  • wear two hats
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.