usher

[ uhsh-er ]
/ ˈʌʃ ər /

noun

verb (used with object)

to act as an usher to; lead, introduce, or conduct: She ushered them to their seats.
to attend or bring at the coming or beginning; precede or herald (usually followed by in): to usher in the new theater season.

verb (used without object)

to act as an usher: He ushered at the banquet.

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Origin of usher

1350–1400; Middle English uscher doorkeeper < Anglo-French usser, Old French (h)uissier doorman, officer of justice < Vulgar Latin *ustiārius, equivalent to Latin ōsti(um) door + -ārius -ary; see -er2

OTHER WORDS FROM usher

ush·er·ship, nounun·der·ush·er, nounun·ush·ered, adjective

Definition for usher (2 of 3)

Usher
[ uhsh-er ]
/ ˈʌʃ ər /

noun

James. Ussher, James.

Definition for usher (3 of 3)

Ussher

or Ush·er

[ uhsh-er ]
/ ˈʌʃ ər /

noun

James,1581–1656, Irish prelate and scholar.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for usher

British Dictionary definitions for usher (1 of 3)

usher
/ (ˈʌʃə) /

noun

verb (tr)

to conduct or escort, esp in a courteous or obsequious way
(usually foll by in) to be a precursor or herald (of)

Word Origin for usher

C14: from Old French huissier doorkeeper, from Vulgar Latin ustiārius (unattested), from Latin ostium door

British Dictionary definitions for usher (2 of 3)

Usher
/ (ˈʌʃə) /

noun

a variant spelling of (James) Ussher

British Dictionary definitions for usher (3 of 3)

Ussher

Usher

/ (ˈʌʃə) /

noun

James. 1581–1656, Irish prelate and scholar. His system of biblical chronology, which dated the creation at 4004 bc, was for long accepted
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012